Archive for Face Care

Should I use Coconut Oil on my Face?

Using coconut Oil on the face seems to be a ‘fad’ right now. We often get customers and clients who ask about its use. I do not recommend that people use just coconut oil on their face for several reasons.

coconuts

Coconut oil consists of triglycerides that are mainly composed of short and medium chain fatty acids such as lauric acid. Lauric acid has 12 carbons. There is nothing innately wrong with lauric acid and it has benefits for the skin, but your skin needs so much more than JUST lauric acid.

An important part of the skin barrier function is the matrix of lipids (including fatty acids) found in the stratum corneum (outer layer of the epidermis).  The skin barrier functions to protect the skin from water loss, and to protect the body from the outer environment.   Linoleic acid, an 18 carbon fatty acid found in olive oil, grapeseed oil, sunflower oil and rice bran oil is an important component of the skin barrier system and has been found to help relieve dry skin. Palmitoleic acid found in macadamia nut oil has 16 carbons. It too plays an important part in the integrity of skin. A variety of longer chain fatty acids that are not found in coconut oil are crucial for the the integrity of the skin.

Coconut oil does not provide moisture to the skin as some people think.  Moisture means water. An oil alone, such as coconut, can help trap water in the skin but it cannot add water or moisture to the skin. Only water can do that. A good moisturizer is the perfect combination of water to hydrate and oil to help moisture stay in the skin – but you need both.

Coconut oil has fewer sterols and phenolics that act as antioxidants, compared to other oils such as sunflower and rice bran oil.

Coconut oil also has a lower level of vitamin e (tocopherols) compared to other oils.

Coconut oil is considered comodegenic. This means that it clogs pores and makes it particularly harmful for acneic skin but can cause any skin type to become congested.

Just as we are encouraged by nutritionists to eat a wide variety of foods for proper nutrition and functioning of our body in whole, it is just as important to give a variety of nutrients to our skin. This can be done by using a product that contains a variety of different plant based oils as well as added nutrients.

We of course recommend Springtide Face cream with rice bran oil, olive oil, raspberry seed oil and meadowfoam oils. Or if you prefer an all oil product, try Parsley Eye Serum with olive oil, sea buckthorn oil and Macadamia nut oil. This way you are getting a variety of fatty acids, as well as added antioxidants delivered to your skin.

 

Decollete Skin Care

Do you take care of your Decollete? Do you know what it is? Decollete is a French term given to the upper chest, neck, cleavage and shoulder areas. It is one of the first places on a woman to show age and so should be cared for in a similar way as we care for our faces.  If you spend much time outside, this area is often exposed to sun too but we tend to not pay so much attention to putting sunscreen here.  The Decollete is prone to hyperpigmentation and degradation of collagen that occurs due to exposure to UV light.

decolette

There are important physiological differences between the face and decollete.  Skin on the face contains more sebaceous or oil glands that help lubricate and protect skin moisture. The skin on the neck and chest is thinner and has less adipose tissue.  The dermis also quickly thins in the chest area. Together this means the chest is more prone to dry skin and ultimately results in a sagging, crepe – like appearance. Melanocyte activity also results in hyperpigmentation spots.  Erythema (redness) and telangiectasias are also common. Telangiectasias are dilated blood vessels or spider veins.  A common formation of wrinkles on the neck are those that occur in horizontal lines across the neck and are known as ‘necklace’ wrinkles.

Another condition found on the neck and chest is Poikiloderma of Civatte (PC). This refers to a combination of hyperpigmentation and dilated blood vessels that occur on the sides of the neck but avoids the front of the neck or throat area.  It causes a mottled appearance to the skin. This condition is related to sun exposure but also to cosmetics or perfumes that are worn in that area of the neck. It is also related to hormones and increases with menopause.

So how do we care for the decollete?

Be sure to apply your sunscreen to the neck and chest area as well as your face.

Remember to always moisturize your decollete area and massage the moisturizer into the skin.

Focus on ingredients in moisturizers that address firmness and elasticity – hyaluronic acid, palmitoyl tripeptide-5, vitamin A, vitamin C.

Focus on ingredients that address hyperpigmentation and redness – vitamin C, kojic acid, lactic acid (fruit extracts), green tea, algae, niacinamide. This may mean using a mask several times a week in this area as  you would on your face.

Products that we recommend for this area are Springtide Gold Face Cream, Razz Tightening Serum, Starbright Mask and Oasis Spray Lotion. Its not too late to care for your decollete! So go ahead and wear that great low cut dress and a necklace or earrings that draw attention! Realize your skin!